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3D Printing Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D Printer

Printing a Filament Cleaner for the Sidewinder X1 3D Printer

Using a filament cleaner can help ensure that dirt, debris, dust and fluff doesn’t easily get into the print head via the filament feed.

This works by clasping around the filament and any dirt is removed by the sponge inside it.

In this video we look at the original model and how the very clever hinge system is integrated into the single model print.

We then watching it print as well as the end result when I prepare the sponge and ensure the hinge mechanism works.

All in all a very interesting project that creates something useful for my ongoing 3D printing.

Thank you idig3d for creating and sharing this model on Thingverse: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1692395

Note, I will not be oiling or lubricating the filament – this is for residue removal only.

Thank you for watching.

Rob @ 3DModUK

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3D Printing Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D Printer

Sunlu Copper Silk PLA and Artillery Test Cube

I was so impressed with the Silver Silk version of Sunlu’s PLA filament that I decided to add their Copper Silk PLA to my collection also.

The end result is quite amazing with a beautifully vibrant shiny and eye-catching ‘glow’ to the cube that really did exceed my expectations.

I can’t wait to print more things in this shiny copper colour.

Sunlu PLA Filament
Copper Silk
1.75 mm
1kg spool
Temperature 190 deg C to 220 deg C

Thank you for watching.

Rob @ 3DModUK

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3D Printing Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D Printer

Artillery Test Cube using Multicomp Pro Brown PLA Filament

In this video we’re going to be printing the Artillery Test Cube on the Sidewinder X1 3D printer using Multicomp Pro Brown PLA filament.

The test cube prints a little lighter than the filament appears on the reel. The end result is very good, consistent and accurate print which is what I have come to expect of the Sidewinder X1 and also Multicomp Pro’s filament.

Printed using the standard Artillery test cube of the original memory stick with default settings and parameters.

Multicomp Pro
Brown
PLA Filament
1kg spool
1.75mm
205 dec C to 225 deg C

Thank you for watching.

Rob @ 3DModUK

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3D Printing Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D Printer

Artillery Test Cube using Multicomp Pro Peak Green PLA Filament

In this video we’re going to be printing the Artillery Test Cube on the Sidewinder X1 3D printer using Multicomp Pro Peak Green PLA filament.

The filament is quite vibrant on the reel but its quite another when it has printed. It’s almost a bright lime colour which is very eye-catching, vibrant and striking.

Printed using the standard Artillery test cube of the original memory stick with default settings and parameters.

Multicomp Pro
Peak Green
PLA Filament
1kg spool
1.75mm
205 dec C to 225 deg C

Thank you for watching.

Rob @ 3DModUK

Categories
3D Printing Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D Printer

Artillery Test Cube using Multicomp Yellow PLA Filament

In this video we’re going to be printing the Artillery Test Cube on the Sidewinder X1 3D printer using Multicomp Yellow PLA filament.

The filament appears quite flat in colour on the reel but once printed the end result is a vibrant yellow colour which is bright and striking.

Printed using the standard Artillery test cube of the original memory stick with default settings and parameters.

Multicomp Pro
Yellow
PLA Filament
1kg spool
1.75mm
205 dec C to 225 deg C

Thank you for watching.

Rob @ 3DModUK

Categories
3D Printing Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D Printer

Artillery Test Cube using Multicomp Blue PLA Filament

In this video we’re going to be printing the Artillery Test Cube on the Sidewinder X1 3D printer using Multicomp Blue PLA filament.

The filament appears almost matt blue on the reel but after printing the test cube appears almost metallic blue and is really nice and striking.

Printed using the standard Artillery test cube of the original memory stick with default settings and parameters.

Multicomp Pro
Blue
PLA Filament
1kg spool
1.75mm
205 dec C to 225 deg C

Thank you for watching.

Rob @ 3DModUK

Categories
3D Printing Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D Printer

Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D printed green test cube

In this video we’re printing an Artillery Sidewinder X1 test cube using ICE filaments Daring Darkgreen filament.

Printed using the standard test cube off the original Artillery memory stick with default printer settings.

A nice shade of mid to dark green PLA filament.

I am very impressed with the colour and I am impressed with the print quality too. I can’t wait to print more models with this particular filament.

ICE Filament
PLA Daring Darkgreen
750g spool
1.75mm
180 deg C to 210 deg C

Thank you for watching.

Rob @ 3DModUK

Categories
3D Printing Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D Printer

PLA Temperature Test – Fourth Attempt = Continued Failure

This is my fourth attempt at what I considered to be a fantastic little ‘torture test’ for the Artillery Sidewinder X1 printer.

I realised I couldn’t solve this on my own so I sought help from a group on Facebook. Others kindly suggested different print settings and especially on the subject of retraction.

I applied these settings in Cura, sliced the file, modified the .GCode file to apply the temperature settings at the appropriate layers and transferred the file over to the printer.

Everything was looking fine initially and certainly much better than before until disaster happened once again.

I am beginning to wonder whether the machine is not capable of printing this very specific test.

The Facebook group I refer to:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/artilleryswx1/

Link to .GCode file:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1pEFeaoiLLR2ISQnEeTc6thi05Nxj9WVG?usp=sharing

Thank you for watching.

Rob @ 3DModUK

Categories
3D Printing Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D Printer

PLA Temperature Test – Third Attempt = Failure

In this third test using the ‘Temperature Tower’ I have adjusted the print settings in Cura which should reduce the stringing.

I looked specifically at the retraction settings so that the print head could retract filament prior to moving between each of the upright towers.

I followed the same pre-printing process as before:

  1. I imported the STL file into Cura, updated the settings and exported the GCode file
  2. I opened the GCode file in Repetier to identify layer heights
  3. I manually modified the GCode file to specific temperatures within the file itself so the 3D printer would adjust the temperatures automatically
  4. I saved the modified GCode file to the memory stick and transferred to the Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D printer for printing

I had high hopes for this particular test expecting it to be a much more successful result, when in fact, it was worse than the previous version.

What did I learn from this test?

I’m not sure. There must be a way of getting this particular model to print and I am sure I can, I just need to find the ideal settings.

Project files available from here:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1ymMRCnmFyUiiFc6FFjW54-uVuFO-t8sr?usp=sharing

Thank you for watching.

Rob @ 3DModUK

Categories
3D Printing Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D Printer Blender General

PLA Temperature Test – First Attempt = Failure

In my previous ‘Overhang Test’ on the Artillery Sidewinder X1 I noticed the print was ‘stringy’. I tried adding retraction and this didn’t work so I wondered if this was something to do with print temperature and the best way of checking this is to come up with another test.

In this video I create a ‘Temperature Tower’ in blender so I can test different print temperatures at different levels of the tower.

And, in order to test as many things in one go I come up with an elaborate – perhaps too elaborate – triple tower with aspects such as cut-outs and overhangs.

This however was to be my downfall, or should I say the models downfall!

  1. Create the model in blender
  2. Export the model as an STL file
  3. Load the STL file into Cura and export the GCode file
  4. Load the GCode file into Repetier and identify the layers for the appropriate temperature changes
  5. Modify the GCode file and set specific temperatures at the specific levels of the tower print
  6. Copy the GCode file to the printer
  7. Print using ICE Filaments ‘Romantic Red’ filament

What did I learn from this project?

  1. The model was too complicated and I should have just kept it simple.
  2. Supports aren’t only required to ensure that anything overhanging can print, they can be also present to stabilise the model whilst printing while the plastic is still hot and malleable until cooled.

These tests not only help me learn about the Artillery Sidewinder X1 3D printer, but also the software, print settings and the approach to getting the best out of the 3D prints.

Taking this into account, I am sure my next test will be more successful.

If you would like to see original blender model, STL or GCode files you can access them here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1inscgoN-lk4j02i-LrmP3OqYywpXEzWL?usp=sharing

Thank you for watching.

Rob @ 3DModUK